Ford Ranger Plug-in Hybrid arriving in 2025 - Select Car Leasing
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Ford Ranger Plug-in Hybrid arriving in 2025

Ford has confirmed that a plug-in hybrid option will be joining its Ranger pickup line-up.


Due to arrive in 2025, Ford is keen to assure buyers that the petrol-electric Ranger PHEV will be a “no-compromise” pickup, providing customers with a hard-working vehicle with the capability to operate on road, off-road and off-grid, but within the latest environmental legislation.

Petrol-Electric Hybrid Powertrain

While current Rangers — bar the Raptor — are powered by either a 2.0-litre four-cylinder or 3.0-litre V6 diesel engine, the hybrid version will see a 2.3-litre four-cylinder EcoBoost petrol engine working in conjunction with an electric motor.

While Ford has yet to disclose the finer technical details of both the motor and battery pack, it does claim that the PHEV will offer the level of performance that Ranger drivers have come to expect and that it will provide more torque than the rest of the Ranger models — so expect at least 600Nm.

The Ranger PHEV will have an all-electric range of around 28 miles from a full charge, with the hybrid system offering improved fuel economy and, according to Ford, a “significant” reduction in CO2 emissions.

While 28 miles might seem a little low, analysis of vehicle data shows that more than half of Ranger drivers use their vehicles to make multiple short trips, covering less than 25 miles over a day. The PHEV-powered Ranger should allow them to complete their day purely under electric power and, thanks to the petrol engine tucked under the bonnet, remove any range anxiety or charging woes if they need to travel further, offering the best of both worlds for many.


Four driving modes are available with the hybrid model — Auto, EV Now, EV Later and EV Charge — giving drivers the flexibility to choose whether to use electric energy to drive the vehicle or replenish the batteries with the petrol engine. Alternatively, the driver can rely on the pickup to autonomously select the most appropriate mode using its geofencing feature. This can, for example, select the pure electric mode when entering a low-emission zone in a city centre.

The Ranger PHEV won’t be able to charge at a rapid charger, so owners can only plug into a regular wall socket using AC charging. While we don’t know how big the battery pack in the plug-in hybrid is, if it borrows the 14.4kWh pack from the Ford Kuga SUV, it would take just under five hours to fully charge from empty.

Business-Friendly Payload and Towing

Ford was keen to retain the Ranger’s load-lugging capabilities, so the plug-in hybrid model has the same 3.5-tonne towing capacity as the regular pickups. Crucially for UK users, some versions of the Ranger PHEV can carry 1,000kg of payload, making it more tax-efficient for business users. However, while Ford remains tight-lipped for now, we understand not every model will manage that, with higher-spec Rangers falling short.


Chris Rushton, marketing manager for Ford Pro Vehicles:
“Customers are telling us they need new powertrain solutions that allow them to enhance the sustainability of their vehicle while continuing to do everything they already do every day. They need to be able to carry as much, tow as much and tackle the same tough off-road driving as they currently do, and Ranger plug-in delivers that.”

Heavy-duty rear suspension and additional bracing have been fitted to the chassis to compensate for the extra weight of the battery pack and electric motor. There’s also new steering and engine tuning, which Ford claims will allow the Ranger PHEV to retain the driving dynamics of the diesel-powered models on and off the road.

While payload limits remain high, it’s clear that adding electric power has reduced the volume in the load box, with Ford’s photos showing a slope at the rear of the load bed that leads to a raised floor.

Pro Power Onboard

Ford is expanding its Pro Power Onboard product to the Ranger PHEV. Starting on the US-market F-150 pickup and seen on the E-Transit van, the system behaves like an onboard generator, providing electricity to power tools and accessories.


The hybrid battery pack delivers power to three-pin 230v sockets in the cabin and load box. Ford says the system is strong enough to power a vast array of electrical devices, from circular saws and drills to TVs and fridges. Workers will have access to power whenever they’re working off-site, without needing to carry a generator with them or being concerned about running out of battery and failing to get home. The battery can then be recharged by running the petrol engine, either on the move or on-site, or plugging into the mains later.

The system will be available on all plug-in models, although Ford wouldn’t comment on whether it will be fitted as standard across the range.

Arriving in 2025

It’s expected that Ford will introduce the PHEV powertrain across its range of pickups, including the most popular Wildtrak specification, but it won’t be taking orders for the Ranger PHEV until mid-2024, with first deliveries not expected until 2025.

With the model so far away from being on our roads, Ford isn’t providing any detail on pricing or specifications. However, as with any plug-in vehicle, expect it to be noticeably more expensive than its diesel-powered counterparts.


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Saturday, 18/05/2024